• Baraka

Mighty Morphin Power Rangers #40 Review - Return of the Real Power Rangers

Updated: Jan 11

Ryan Parrott (Writer) • Daniele Di Nicuolo (Pencils)

Walter Baiamonte (Colorist) • Jamal Campbell (Cover Artist)

Boom Studios (Publisher) • Get if now from Comixology

After 1000 years we're finally free of Marguerite Bennett's abysmal "Beyond The Grid" story arc. Maybe now we can finally return to a slightly recognizable status quo.


The comic starts at the conclusion of "Shattered Grid" with the Rangers making the choice to fix the multiverse at the expense of their memories of what has transpired. It's a huge personal sacrifice for our heroes. Relationships are broken and friendships are lost. The sacrifice also shows just how dedicated the Power Rangers to their role as earth's protectors and beyond.

The book then shifts further into the timeline. Tommy is now the White Ranger and has assumed the role of team leader. Jason, Trini, and Zack are no longer Rangers. If you were watching the show during this era you probably know where we are in the timeline.


There have also been significant changes on the villain side as Lord Zedd has assumed control from Rita. Zedd immediately comes off as a bigger threat than Rita ever was. It will be interesting to see how the series plays out with Zedd at the helm as the big bad.

Simone Di Meo is no longer providing pencils but Daniele Di Nicuolo does an adequate job in keeping the art style tonally consistent. Everything looks solid. The action sequences also represent a return to form over the previous arc that had very little compelling action.


I'm really just happy to get back to normalcy. I understand that with "Beyond the Grid" Boom Studios was probably looking to expand the world the Rangers occupied. The problem was that they chose the wrong writer to tell that story. Ryan Parrott keeps things simple and focuses on the characters. The pretentiousness and melodrama are dialed back and what's left is the forward progression of a story featuring core characters that we care about.

Rating: 8/10